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ORIGINAL INDIAN WARS PERIOD CHEVRONS AND BRASSARDS:  These original Indian War Period Chevrons and Brassards are the pieces I currently have in stock.  Each offering specifies whether the item is a single piece or matched pair, is described individually and accompanied by a photograph.  The item(s) shown is the exact piece you will receive.  This stock is changing continuously, so if you do not see the insignia you are looking for, keep checking back. 

 

PATTERN 1872 CAVALRY CHIEF TRUMPETER SERGEANT CHEVRONS – RARE MATCHED PAIR IN EXCELLENT UNISSUED CONDITION:  Introduced with the post Civil War uniform changes and continued in service through the end of the Indian War era, this insignia was officially known as the “Chief Trumpeter” Chevron, a non-commissioned officer rank.  This particular chevron would have been issued to the senior musician – in the case of the cavalry, the senior trumpeter – serving in a cavalry regiment, indicated by the yellow bars and horn.  

In excellent condition, this matched pair correctly has the trumpet configured on the center insert so that the mouth of the trumpet faces forward when worn on each sleeve of the uniform.  The insert and chevrons show no evidence of use or age, no moth damage, and no soiling, and most importantly, they are still attached at the top center with the original single stitch of thread which kept the pair intact until they were issued.  Finding original pairs of chevrons intact such as this set is very unusual. 

Given that there was only one "Chief Trumpeter" in each regiment, this is a very rare matched set of Indian War insignia, and they will be a very attractive and colorful addition to your display. (0245)  $350

 

PATTERN 1872 CAVALRY TRUMPETER SERGEANT CHEVRON – EXCELLENT UNISSUED CONDITION:  Introduced with the post Civil War uniform changes and continued in service through the end of the Indian War era, this insignia was officially known as the “Principal Musician” Chevron, a non-commissioned officer rank.  This particular chevron would have been issued to a musician – most likely one of the senior trumpeters – serving in a cavalry regiment, indicated by the yellow bars and horn.  

In excellent condition, the insert and chevrons show no evidence of use or age, no moth damage, and no soiling.  Given the limited numbers of trumpeters in any one regiment, and certainly the few Principal Musicians, this is a scarce piece of Indian War insignia, and one that will be a very attractive display piece.  (0426)  $175

 

ca. 1889 SIGNAL CORPS CORPORAL CHEVRON – EXCELLENT UNISSUED CONDITION:  A like new original late Indian War or Spanish American War eras US Army Signal Corps Corporal chevron.   With the very limited number of Signalmen in the army, and even fewer who were promoted to one of the noncommissioned officer ranks, this is a relatively scarce insignia.  Worn on the upper sleeve of the soldier's uniform coat, this distinctive enlisted insignia features a colorful  Signal Corps emblem on dark blue wool, creating an attractive piece which will be a nice addition to your collection.  A complete unissued, unused brassard with no damage or moth holes.  (0419)  $150

 

PATTERN 1892 CAVALRY SADDLER BRASSARDS - SCARCE SPANISH AMERICAN WAR INSIGNIA:  Introduced just prior to the Spanish American War for wear in the tropics, the khaki and white cotton uniforms proved to be practical and serviceable additions to the soldier's clothing options.  In turn, the army added cotton drill chevrons and brassards to the Pattern 1872 Chevrons which were worn on the dark blue wool uniforms. 

Identical in form and color selections as the woolen brassards, these cotton drill brassards feature a yellow wool saddler's knife approximately one quarter the size of the Pattern 1872 Saddler Brassards sewn on a khaki and a white cotton drill background. 

As the number of  Saddlers per regiment was limited, this is a relatively scarce insignia.  Worn on the upper sleeve of the soldier's uniform coat, this piece is one of the distinctive enlisted insignias of the Spanish American War period.  These are the brassards a cavalry regimental or company level saddler would have worn in Cuba and the Philippine Islands during the last decade of the 19th Century and the first few years of the 20th Century. 

Consistent with the low survival rate of the early khaki uniforms, very few of these matching cotton brassards appear on the market.  This would be a nice addition to your Spanish American War display. 

I have the two single specimens shown below. 

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KHAKI MOUNTED PATTERN 1892 CAVALRY SADDLER BRASSARD:  In excellent condition, this brassard shows very little evidence of use or age, and no soiling.  The stitching around the perimeter of the brassard indicates it was sewn to a uniform coat at one time.  The wool saddler's knife shaped insignia is full form and presents as close to like new condition as you are likely to find.  $75

WHITE DRILL MOUNTED PATTERN 1892 CAVALRY SADDLER BRASSARD:  Showing some evidence of wear, this brassard has suffered the effects of aging, but still survives as a credible example of a scarce brassard of the period.  The wool saddler's knife shaped insignia has some mothing on the right side, but still retains its shape and form.  The white cotton drill has some staining in one spot, but is otherwise clean and the material is very solid.  $45

 

CAVALRY FARRIER BRASSARD: A like new original Indian War Period US Army Cavalry Farrier Brassard.  As the number of Farriers (Horseshoers) per regiment was limited, this is a relatively scarce insignia.  Worn on the upper sleeve of the soldier's uniform coat, this piece is one of the distinctive enlisted insignias of the Indian War period.  The combination of Dark Blue, Yellow, and Gray wool creates an attractive piece and makes for a nice addition to your collection.  A complete unissued, unused brassard with no damage or moth holes.  $95

 

PATTERN 1872 CAVALRY QUARTERMASTER SERGEANT CHEVRON – EXCELLENT UNISSUED CONDITION:  Introduced with the post Civil War uniform changes and continued in service through the end of the Indian War era, the Quartermaster Sergeant was one of the most senior, and most important, non-commissioned officers on a frontier army post.  It was through his hands and by his authority that all things related to the quality of life of the soldier passed, including the buildings (such as they were) in which they lived.  He was a contractor, a dietitian, a haberdasher, a tailor, a horse trader, a freight and expressman, and a landlord, and he was probably the one non-commissioned officer on the post who could guarantee a reasonably good night's sleep on a full stomach or a miserable sleepless night on an empty one.  

In excellent condition, this chevron show no evidence of use or age, no moth damage, and no soiling.  Given the limited numbers of quartermaster sergeants in any one regiment, this is a relatively scarce piece of Indian War insignia.  (0941)  $125

 

ca. 1889 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT SERGEANT CHEVRON – EXCELLENT UNISSUED CONDITION:  A like new original 1889 US Army Ordnance Department Sergeant chevron.  Differentiated from the red Artillery chevrons, the Ordnance Department were made with a deeper crimson color.  With the very limited number of Ordnance Department noncommissioned officers, this is a relatively scarce insignia.  Worn on the upper sleeve of the soldier's uniform coat, this distinctive enlisted insignia features a colorful  Flaming Bomb emblem on dark blue wool, creating an attractive piece which will be a nice addition to your collection.  A complete unissued, unused brassard with no damage or moth holes.  (0420)  $150

 

PATTERN 1899 CAVALRY  SERGEANT CHEVRON – EXCELLENT CONDITION:  Introduced just prior to the Spanish American War for wear in the tropics, the khaki cotton uniforms proved to be a practical and serviceable addition to the soldier's clothing options.  As a result, these cotton drill chevrons were added for the new uniforms instead of the Pattern 1872 Chevrons worn on the blue wool blouses.  Identical in size and color selections to the woolen chevrons, these cotton drill chevrons incorporated the blue chain stitched trim.   This is the chevron a cavalry sergeant would have worn in Cuba and the Philippine Islands during the last decade of the 19th Century and the first few years of the 20th Century. 

In excellent condition, the chevron show no evidence of use or age, and no soiling.  Consistent with the low survival rate of the early khaki uniforms, very few of these matching cotton chevrons appear on the market.  This would be a nice addition to your Spanish American War display.  (0133)  $65

 

ca. 1879 INFANTRY CORPORAL GREAT COAT CHEVRONS - EXCELLENT PAIR:  This dark blue chevron was introduced in 1879 specifically for the Infantry soldiers to wear on the sleeves of their greatcoats, rather than the white wool chevrons worn on their blouses or five button sack coats as they are also known.  Of the same pattern and material as the standard Model 1872 Infantry Chevrons, this pair of original Indian War Period US Army Infantry Corporal Chevrons is made of the same type of wool as the white chevrons and is trimmed with a white cording per the regulations.  The chevrons are in excellent condition and show no evidence of use, wear or soiling.  This is an attractive pair to display with an Indian Wars Infantry grouping.  (0801)  $65

 

PATTERN 1888 HOSPITAL STEWARD CHEVRON:  Introduced under General Order No. 6 in 1888, this chevron was worn by a Hospital Steward, the senior enlisted medical specialist on the post.  Incorporating the Maltese cross on a blue field, this chevron replaced the previous hospital steward's insignia of a single diagonal green wool stripe bordered in gold cord with an embroidered gold caduceus.  

In very good condition, there is some minor mothing at the crest of the blue insert where it meets the arc of green wool across the top of the chevron.  The full extent of this mothing can be seen in the photo below.  I intentionally placed the chevron against a lighter background so the mothing would show, however displayed against a dark blue background as the chevron would be worn on a uniform coat, this mothing is almost impossible to detect.  This is not a commonly encountered chevron and it is a colorful piece to add to a collection of Indian Wars era insignia.  (0130)  $75

 

1899 INFANTRY BATTALION SERGEANT MAJOR GREAT COAT CHEVRON – VERY NICE PIECE:  This is an original US Army Infantry Battalion Sergeant Major’s Chevron, a rank added to the army’s rank structure in 1899.  Prior to this date, there was only one sergeant major in each regiment.  Since in practice, most of the regiments were divided up, and detachments of a single company, or in some cases a battalion made up of several companies, were assigned to independent posts or stations, the addition of a sergeant major at the battalion level provided more supervision and leadership for the soldiers.   

These dark blue chevrons were introduced in 1879 specifically for the Infantry soldiers to wear on the sleeves of their greatcoats, rather than the white wool chevrons worn on their blouses or five button sack coats as they are also known. 

Of the same pattern and material as the standard Model 1872 Infantry Chevrons, this original US Army Infantry Battalion Sergeant Major Chevron is made of the same type of wool as the white chevrons and is trimmed with a white cording per the regulations.  The chevron is in excellent condition and shows no evidence of use, wear or soiling, and will be an interesting piece to display with your collection. $50

 

ca. 1892 CAVALRY LANCE CORPORAL CHEVRONS – VERY NICE PAIR:  These chevrons were introduced in March of 1892 with the army’s establishment of the rank of Lance Corporal.  Of the same pattern and material as the Model 1872 Chevrons, this pair of original Indian War Period US Army Cavalry Lance Corporal Chevrons is made of the same type and color of wool as the earlier pattern chevrons - yellow wool trimmed with a dark blue cording per the regulations.  Both chevrons are in excellent condition and show no evidence of use, wear or soiling.  This set will be an attractive piece to display with your collection. $65

 

ca. 1879 INFANTRY CORPORAL GREAT COAT CHEVRON:  This dark blue chevron was introduced in 1879 specifically for the Infantry soldiers to wear on the sleeves of their greatcoats, rather than the white wool chevrons worn on their blouses or five button sack coats as they are also known.  Of the same pattern and material as the standard Model 1872 Infantry Chevrons, this original Indian War Period US Army Infantry Corporal Chevron is made of the same type of wool as the white chevrons and is trimmed with a white cording per the regulations.  The chevron is in excellent condition and shows no evidence of use, wear or soiling.  This is an attractive piece to display with your collection. $25

 

PATTERN 1872 CAVALRY ORDNANCE SERGEANT CHEVRON INSERT:  Introduced with the post Civil War uniform changes and continued in service through the end of the Indian War era, this chevron insert was sewn into the "V" of the sergeant's chevron to identify the soldier as an Ordnance Sergeant serving in the cavalry as indicated by the yellow wool outlining the center star.  In excellent condition, this insert shows little evidence of use or age, having no moth damage and only some slight soiling which likely collected under the stripe when the insert was part of the full chevron.  A scarce piece of Indian War insignia and a very attractive display piece.  SOLD

 

PATTERN 1888 INFANTRY SERGEANT GOLD LACE CHEVRON FOR WEAR ON THE DRESS COAT – EXCELLENT UNISSUED CONDITION:  Introduced under General Order No. 6 in 1888, these gold lace chevrons were to be worn on the soldier's dress coats.  A much dressier departure from the wool chevrons that had served for both the service blouse and the dress coat since 1872, the addition of these gold lace chevrons dramatically improved the appearance of the dress uniforms.  This chevron was worn by an infantry sergeant, indicated by the gold lace applied to a white wool field - white having replaced light blue as the facing color for infantry under the same general order cited above. 

In excellent condition, the chevrons and wool facing show no evidence of use or age, no moth damage, and no soiling.  Gold lace chevrons are not particularly common and when found, are seldom in this fine condition.   SOLD

 

PATTERN 1892 CAVALRY REGIMENTAL SERGEANT MAJOR CHEVRONS – PAIR – EXCELLENT CONDITION:  Introduced just prior to the Spanish American War for wear in the tropics, the khaki cotton uniforms proved to be a practical and serviceable addition to the soldier's clothing options.  In addition, the army added these cotton drill chevrons to replace the Pattern 1872 Chevrons.  Identical in size and color selections to the woolen chevrons, these cotton drill chevrons were sewn on a dark blue wool field so they could be worn on the dark blue blouse, the dark blue wool shirt, or trimmed, they could be worn on the khaki blouse.  This is the chevron a cavalry regimental sergeant major would have worn in Cuba and the Philippine Islands during the last decade of the 19th Century and the first few years of the 20th Century. 

In excellent condition, the chevron shows no evidence of use or age, and no soiling.  Consistent with the low survival rate of the early khaki uniforms, very few of these matching cotton chevrons appear on the market.  This would be a nice addition to your Spanish American War display.  SOLD

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